LETTERS FROM THE GLOBAL PROVINCE




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2007 LETTERS

 

2007 LETTERS

The Art of Gifting; Tis the Season to Be Jolly (December 12, 2007)
“Good things come from somewhere, not everywhere.”  To read more, click here.

Friends of Global Province (December 5, 2007)
“[O]ur charter is to be a bit more creative than other firms, so we also wander pretty far afield.”  To read more, click here.

Getting out of the Hothouse (November 28, 2007)
“It is apparent that our push to do more and go higher has often become a losing game, where systems, parents, teachers, students, and institutions implode.”  To read more, click here.

All About Bird Dogs: Knowing What We’re Here For (November 14, 2007)
“As the saying goes, these bird dogs can find a lot of ‘new pigeons’ for us.”  To read more, click here.

Precious Imports: We Need Those Personas Non Grata (November 7, 2007)
“A rethink is in order, because we often are not guarding the right gates.”  To read more, click here.

Looking for Small Fish in Big Pond (October 31, 2007)
“[We] must be small, agile fish in a huge pond.”  To read more, click here.

Globalization: Culture Carriers (October 24, 2007)
“As we are discovering in our consulting practice, art travels and transforms.”  To read more, click here.

Europe: The Whole Is less than the Sum of Its Parts (October 17, 2007)
“It’s the paradox of our time that only unbelievers ... celebrate the wide open opportunities the future still offers to us.”  To read more, click here.

Natural Energy: They Said It Couldn’t Be Done (October 10, 2007)
“It’s the paradox of our time that only unbelievers ... celebrate the wide open opportunities the future still offers to us.”  To read more, click here.

The Repairmen (October 3, 2007)
“This idea of obsolescence is outmoded.”  To read more, click here.

Lies, Estrogen, Useful Tips, Saving on Gas, Microtrends, Homespun Wisdom, and Urawaza (September 19, 2007)
There’s a need to act in the face of this sea of misinformation.”  To read more, click here.

A Noble & Thrifty Tree (September 12, 2007)
No culture anywhere can reach for the heavens without a lofty tree.  To read more, click here.

The Lost Art of Luxury (September 5, 2007)
True luxury not only depends on well honed products but on grace and good deportment from the whole congregation—from every customer and every server.  To read more, click here.

The End Is in Sight (August 29, 2007)
“Busy shoring up the past, companies generally have not uncovered a new corporate architecture and grand strategy that take aim at the years ahead.  To read more, click here.

O Captain! My Captain! (August 22, 2007)
“We no longer have to worry about Red Octobers and other Soviet threats: we have seen the new enemy and it may be us.  To read more, click here.

Did Camus Ever Giggle? (August 8, 2007)
Serious is a disease of the spirit that’s going around now, and it’s to be dreaded as much AIDS or bird flu.  To read more, click here.

How to Vacation (August 1, 2007)
The planet’s as tired as we are.  Give it a break.  To read more, click here.

Flying into the Eye of the Hurricane (July 25, 2007)
“It’s axiomatic that you have to get outside the very big cities to find someone who truly knows something undiscovered.  To read more, click here.

The Bronze Horseman (July 18, 2007)
Around the world we have raised a whole generation that has never been touched by greatness.  To read more, click here.

Don't Hang Up (July 11, 2007)
TV and cell phones had the potential to make a much better world, but instead, seem to have gorged it with mediocrity.”  To read more, click here.

Caught a Big One (July 4, 2007)
“Isn’t it interesting what can get done with four hour lunches and no contracts?”  To read more, click here.

Gone Fishin’ (June 13, 2007)
One can beat the unbeatable with slowness and strategic retreats.  To read more, click here.

It Pays You Not to Be a Philistine (June 6, 2007)
“Culture ... still pays off.  Herein lie dramatic lessons for urban and national development.”  To read more, click here.

Literay Martinis (May 30, 2007)
If we are to preserve ‘taste,’ we must fashion valuable one-of-a-kind local products that are integral to our culture—that are not at all the same the world over.”  To read more, click here.

Fixing Our Martinis and Our Health (May 23, 2007)
“All the stuff and nonsense we surround ourselves with is laying us low.”  To read more, click here.

The Name Game (May 16, 2007)
“There’s a whole industry built around this naming of things that gives very expensive, often mistaken advice to the world’s biggest companies for which corporate chieftains pay a wad.”  To read more, click here.

Better Than Best—Second: Terroir (May 9, 2007)
“Everything—earth, sun, climate—must come together to make for perfection.  An alignment of the stars.”  To read more, click here.

Better Than Best—First (May 2, 2007)
“In a globally connected world, one is looking for artisans and individuals who are disconnected enough to rise above the herd.”  To read more, click here.

The Babes of New York and Mount Everest (April 25, 2007)
“In a town where the men do not distinguish themselves by pursuing the common interest and civilized interchange, they were both life giving and lively.”  To read more, click here.

North Country Fair (April 18, 2007)
“This helpfulness and down-to-earthness just don’t happen in most places.”  To read more, click here.

Resurrection (April 11, 2007)
“[W]e are seeking some way to turn around big corporations, institutions, and governments in decline.  To restore their get up and go.”  To read more, click here.

Fly in the Ointment (April 4, 2007)
“Beware of fine businesses that have been shopped around too much. They lose it.”  To read more, click here.

In Praise of Siestas (March 28, 2007)
“We require new energy and new thinking from all those small countries that go unnoticed and where things are working a bit better.”  To read more, click here.

La Fhéile Pádraig: Corned Beef and Cabbage (March 21, 2007)
“We might, as well, celebrate the Irish miracle, even if it does not have religious origins.”  To read more, click here.

Up against the Wall (March 14, 2007)
“Turning them around involves a top to bottom shakeup, much more comprehensive than financial engineers, strategy gurus, or operations managers can envision.”  To read more, click here.

Dog Gone (March 7, 2007)
Getting more craft back into our goods and services ... is our only answer to manufactures from other nations oversupplied with laborers who receive each month what our workers earn in a day.”  To read more, click here.

In Search of Searchlights (February 28, 2007)
The world of intelligence is the same as the world of media is the same as the world of digital media.”  To read more, click here.

A Few Good Buys (February 21, 2007)
“We have a theory that you should take a look at companies that have been to hell and back.  It’s like going to the secondhand store and getting a deal.”  To read more, click here.

Prometheus Unbound: Catching Fire Again (February 14, 2007)
It’s rather ironic that the true imperative of globalization is to understand how to get increasingly local, particular, special, one-of-a-kind, like-no-other.”  To read more, click here.

UnZipping Memories (February 7, 2007)
“Are the atmospherics such that it’s just too hard to think straight?”  To read more, click here.

High on the Hog (January 31, 2007)
“As near as we can make out, good humor and celebrations seem to be enemies of the state almost everywhere on earth: governments do a better job at funerals.”  To read more, click here.

The Cost of Things (January 24, 2007)
Now the price of ‘too much’ is ‘too high.’  Perhaps the follies of youth become the psychoses of old age.  Then it was playful excess; now it’s competitive materialism decked out in stress.”  To read more, click here.

The Translator's Alchemy (January 17, 2007)
We need interpretation, communication, intellectual vigor, instruction infused with the honest spirit that pours in through stained glass windows.  Then we will hear the warning bells.”  To read more, click here.

For the Love of Learning (January 10, 2007)
“In some measure, new forms of education are arising that diminish the very importance of our current, plodding institutions that have lost the ability to teach people to read and write.”  To read more, click here.